nyctaeus:

Hans Haacke, ‘Condensation Cube’, 1965
In 1962, Haacke began to make works such as ‘Condensation Cube’, which incorporate pexiglass containers filled with water in order to instantiate natural processes. The focus on natural processes such as condensation and evaporation reflects his early affiliation with the German “Group Zero” and their experimentation with abstract form modified by phenomena such as light, shadow, reflection, and motion. The work’s cubic shape additionally points to Haacke’s encounter with Minimalism, yet he departs from the industrial vocabulary of its materials. As Benjamin Buchloh explains, the viewer of “Condensation Cube” is “no longer exclusively, or even primarily linked to the work through perceptual interaction, but rather observes the traces and texture of physiological and physical processes generated within the work, which operates in relative independence from the viewing subject”. 

nyctaeus:

Hans Haacke, ‘Condensation Cube’, 1965

In 1962, Haacke began to make works such as ‘Condensation Cube’, which incorporate pexiglass containers filled with water in order to instantiate natural processes. The focus on natural processes such as condensation and evaporation reflects his early affiliation with the German “Group Zero” and their experimentation with abstract form modified by phenomena such as light, shadow, reflection, and motion. The work’s cubic shape additionally points to Haacke’s encounter with Minimalism, yet he departs from the industrial vocabulary of its materials. As Benjamin Buchloh explains, the viewer of “Condensation Cube” is “no longer exclusively, or even primarily linked to the work through perceptual interaction, but rather observes the traces and texture of physiological and physical processes generated within the work, which operates in relative independence from the viewing subject”.